Popular on Instagram for November 2017

This entry was posted on 6th December, 2017 by vero .

Can you believe it's December? The end of the year is just around the corner! And with that we have the next to last installment of the most Popular posts on malabrigo's Instagram feed for this year!

Check out your favourites for November. We hope you enjoy!

The Weekender by Andrea Mowry, knitted by geraknits, using malabrigo Rios in Niebla and Cloud Sunshine.

Liguria by Katrin Schubert, knitted by Pauli369, using malabrigo Mechita in Cereza and Azul Profundo.

Fast Forward Mittens by Simone Bechtold, using malabrigo Worsted in Frank Ochre.

Snow Day Shawl by Knitting Expat Designs, knitted by Judith100, using malabrigo Rios in Pearl, Frank Ochre and Paris Night.

The Colourist by Lisa Hannes, knitted by YarnBandit, using malabrigo Rios in Arco Iris.

Picture posted to Instagram by @mymelange, showing skeins of malabrigo Caracol in Arco Iris.

What do you think? 

The next post will be next year, in the year 2018, showing you the most popular posts for December 2017. Crazy, isn't it!? See you then!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

We really enjoy showcasing the work knitters do with our yarns, and have dedicated most of our presence online to do so. Obviously one of the reasons is it's the best way to show our product, for others to see how it looks when worked up in different patterns, but we also think it's important to put a big spotlight on the knitters out there that do a wonderful job.

It's in this spirit that we would like to leave in the blog the 5 projects that you liked best from our Instagram account, as a sort of snapshot of the month.

Malabrigo Quickie: Savvy Hat and Cowl by Lindsay Lewchuk

This entry was posted on 20th November, 2017 by Barbara .

Designing under the name KnitEcoChic Lindsay Lewchuk specializes in using yarns that don't contain any animal fibers. She chose to use our 100% Mulberry silk base Mora to craft two beautiful pieces that feature a combination of lace and cables that she has called Savvy! You can find the Savvy Hat and the Savvy Cowl on Ravelry as separate patterns and as an e-book.

 

The cowl uses just over one skein but you will have enough left over to make the hat so 2 skeins = two pieces! The samples were knit up in Aguas for an amazing watery blue sheen.

When I asked her about her inspiration she had this to say:

Visions of sitting in an Oxford don’s old lecture room, scarcely heated save for the ongoing academic debate, inspired this fashion forward brainy style.  Savvy’s elegance transports you from keeping your cool in the lecture hall to warming things up on a crisp autumn date.  Whether worn in unity or as independent thinkers, Savvy hat and Savvy cowl will win you the final point!

 

Here are some Pattern Details:
Sizes: Cowl - One Size 24”/ 61cm around by 9”/ 23cm tall  
Hat - Small (Medium, Large, X-Large) to fit head sizes 19”/ 48.5cm (20”/ 51cm, 21”/ 53.5cm, 22”/ 56cm) with 1.5”/ 3.8cm negative ease

Materials: 2 skeins Malabrigo Mora shown in Aguas 

US 3 / 3.25mm DPNs or small circulars

Notions: Cable needle, Yarn needle, Stitch markers

 

About KnitEcoChic: Under the watchful eye of Puddles, the Great Dane, intentional design elements coalesce with animal-fiber free eco yarns in each of Lindsay's designs.  Publishing under the name Knit Eco Chic, Lindsay selects fibers that are good for the earth, the producers, the knitters, and the end wearer in order to spread the word about eco conscious knitting through visually interesting and fun to knit designs.  

Knitting as Poetry by Evelyn Politzer

This entry was posted on 11th November, 2017 by vero .

Knitting as Poetry
Reflections on the Natural Environment 
Evelyn Politzer
Curated by Dr.Yolanda Sánchez
October 27, 2017 - May 17, 2018

If you have been to Miami International Airport since October 27th, maybe you have had the pleasure to see this exhibition for yourself. 

With Knitting as Poetry, artist Evelyn Politzer expands  our appreciation of fiber arts and the techniques of knitting and crochet as artistic forms.  Her creative expression offers a bridge between the history of craft and “women’s work” and present concerns regarding the natural environment. 

Malabrigo had the pleasure of sponsoring this exhibition by donationg all the materials used to create these wonderful works of art. 

In this installation, curated by Dr. Yolanda Sanchez, Politzer aims to bring attention to the beauty and fragility of nature, presenting us with evocative forms that stimulate us through their use of color and texture. Her nested structures, in particular, are tender and sensual, their color range suggesting warmth and nurturance. Maternal concerns are often present in Politzer’s work. The adjacent more serene installation, suggestive of aqueous elements, not only presents a visual juxtaposition but is also a reminder of the importance of water conservation, a major issue in Politzer’s immediate community. “Every drop counts” is a slogan in the local educational system. - (text that accompany the installation)

We hope you can make it to Miami International Airport and see if for yourself, you have time until May 17, 2018 

Popular on Instagram for October 2017

This entry was posted on 6th November, 2017 by vero .

Another month has gone by and here we are again to show you what you guys have enjoyed the most on our Instagram Feed during this month. Or at least which ones you pressed the little heart button the most on :) If you want your favourite picture of the month from our IG feed to show up in the top five, be sure to like it! 

Let's start. This month we took the top five plus 1, because they all got a lot of votes, and who minds seeing more knitting, right?

Mega Spun by Kali Berg, knitted by Pluie, using malabrigo Rasta in Arco Iris.

Malabrigo Linen Stitch Scarf by Scott Rohr/rohrknits, knitted by lisaann, using malabrigo Worsted in Pigeon, Hiroshige, Mariposa and Cuarenta.

Morton by Cornelia Tuttle Hamilton, knitted by IG user @knittygrittygirl using malabrigo Mechita in Plomo and Mecha in Aniversario. This pattern is part of malabrigo Book 11 - Aniversario

Wandering Moon by Michelle Hunter, knitted by McMommy4, using malabrigo Arroyo in Piedras.

That Nice Stitch by Susan Ashcroft, knitted by barmel using malabrigo Rios in Arco Iris.

Redshift by Jared Flood, knitted by YellowXDart using
malabrigo Mechita in Cereza and Pearl 

What do you think? 

See you next month to see what November has in store for us!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

We really enjoy showcasing the work knitters do with our yarns, and have dedicated most of our presence online to do so. Obviously one of the reasons is it's the best way to show our product, for others to see how it looks when worked up in different patterns, but we also think it's important to put a big spotlight on the knitters out there that do a wonderful job.

It's in this spirit that we would like to leave in the blog the 5 projects that you liked best from our Instagram account, as a sort of snapshot of the month.

Pellet fuel at malabrigo

This entry was posted on 27th October, 2017 by luciana .

Malabrigo yarn has taken another step to becoming a greener company. We’ve been using Solar Energy to heat the water used for dyeing the yarns for a while, but now we have migrated the majority of our
traditional solutions to another renewable form of energy: Wood Pellets!

Wood Pellets are small tubular organic particles formed with compressed sawdust and other industrial by-products, such runoff waste wood would otherwise go to waste if they were not used to form wood pellets.
They are composed of 100% biological materials from industrial waste which are responsibly recycled, without chemical binding agents or dangerous additives.
Wood Pellets have many environmental benefits over more traditional heating solutions from fossil fuels, while still being able to produce similar levels of energy. They burn cleaner than normal logs or
chips too.

Further benefits including enhanced work site conditions and worker health through cleaner burning fuels. This is generally accepted as a clean form of energy as trees can be easily replanted to replace the CO2 produced when burnt so long as additional wood isn’t harvested in order to produce wood pellets. Burning wood pellets also releases fewer carbon emissions than if the trees were left to decompose in forests.  

Our change to this form of renewable energy marks just the latest of our steps to becoming a more sustainable company and is a part of our commitment to continue towards a cleaner, greener future.

If you want to learn more about wood pellet energy you can follow any of the links below:

https://www.woodpellets.com/blog/2015/04/30/benefits-of-wood-pellets/

https://energy.gov/energysaver/wood-and-pellet-heating

http://www.bioenergy4business.eu/facts-figures/

http://pellet-energy.biz/en/useful-information/wood-pellets-vs-coil-gas-and-others/